Artful Green Dot

Pictures from Storm King Art Center

Posted in Spaces & Environments by Audrey Tran on October 29, 2009

STORM_1Storm King Art Center is a museum that celebrates the relationship between sculpture and nature…”

Although I’ve seen plenty of public art pieces around New York, I’ve rarely seen such an enormous arena devoted to placing art in the environment.   The park seeks to create a dialogue between earth and art, but I wonder if Storm King actually accomplishes this. In many cases, I saw the artwork as an overly dominate force in the landscape while the natural surroundings in some parts seem primed just to fit the specific needs of the artwork. At other times, for example when I saw Sol Lewitt’s contribution to SK, I had to ask myself why such works require this setting. Perhaps the aethetics of the outdoors can be reason enough.

There are, of course, works at SK which definitely benefit when viewed in this unique park. Nam June Paik’s Waiting for U.F.O and Andy Goldsworthy’s Storm King Wall strike me as two good examples.

Here are a few photos from a trip to SK in September.

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Andy Goldsworthy, Storm King Wall '97-98

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Sol Lewitt, Five Modular Units, 1966

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The Aura of 2012+

Posted in Exhibits by Audrey Tran on October 15, 2009

Despite the cold rain two weekends ago, I managed to get to the opening of this new show in Chelsea.  The Drop Gallery is currently showing works from about thirty international artists who have been asked to explore urban environments.

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Some artists approached the subject by documenting peculiar intimacies of urban life (one multi-part sound piece exposes different noises found around famous NYC sites) Others such as Adrian Kondratowicz and Saya Woolfalk created art pieces that draw attention to our already existing world.  On a quick Tweet, I noted that Kondratowicz’s hot pink and black spotted trash bags make garbage look like a party. His installation looked more like life-sized plastic bags for party favors rather than containers of garbage.  Likewise, Woolfalk installed a video of No Place among one of her sculptures created from recycled materials–imagine glue bottles, milk jugs, and soup cans now paper mached and regally covered in gold paint. In No Place, bits of our world seem to emerge subtly, but are always present.

Of the many ways the 2012+ artists handled the subject, I was drawn most to the works that revolved around collaboration–either among the viewers present, or from pre-arranged participants. For example, Yoko Ono’s Wish Tree invites passersby to scribble a wish on note tags, which can then be tied to a potted tree resting in the gallery. Since I caught the show during the first hour of the opening,  only a few notes had been tagged to the tree, but I can imagine how filled it must be by now–and this is quite an image. How blithe and spiritual, it seems, to unload wishes upon a tree. Ono has been showing such pieces since the 1990’s and has previously said “All [her] works are a form of wishing.

Although his international collaboration is set for viewing in December, Hiroshi Sunairi’s Tree Project also made a debut at 2012+ with a sampling of the beautiful trees from his NY participants.

Sunairi’s project is an open call to anyone who wishes to participate in “the pleasure of growing plants,” specifically Hibaku plants, which are seeds that survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

TONIGHT, The Drop will host a closing party for the show and will feature a variety of professionals speaking on their reflections of the word “environment” using no more than “20 slides for 20 seconds” a piece.

2012+ is on view at the Drop Pop Up Gallery on West 25th Street (between 10th and 11th ave) in Chelsea.  See it before October 17th!

Roxy Paine’s Maelstrom

Posted in Uncategorized by Audrey Tran on September 21, 2009

I chose to photograph Roxy Paine’s sculpture using my last three Polaroids.PAINE_Malestrom1 copy

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PAINE_MALESTROM copy

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